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Elision

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e·li·sionəˈliZHən/noun

  1. the omission of a sound or syllable when speaking (as in I'mlet'se ' en ).
    • an omission of a passage in a book, speech, or film."the movie's elisions and distortions have been carefully thought out"
    • the process of joining together or merging things, especially abstract ideas."unease at the elision of so many vital questions"

Moths by Adam Zagajewski

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Moths watched us through
the window. Seated at the table,
we were skewered by their lambent gazes,
harder than their shattering wings.

You’ll always be outside,
past the pane. And we’ll be here within,
more and more in. Moths watched us
through the window, in August.

 

 

See: https://www.versobooks.com/books/2465-humankind

 

Lisboa at Christmas

Inside a universe of light. 

Boa Hora Early Evening

Churros make a fine welcome gift to Lisboa. Hot and sugary.

Lake Washington

Lunch Spot December 2014

Chthonic

1 min read

Chthonic (UK: /ˈkθɒnɪk/US: /ˈθɒnɪk/ from Greek χθόνιος khthonios [kʰtʰónios], "in, under, or beneath the earth", from χθών khthōn "earth")  literally means "subterranean", but the word in English describes deities or spirits of the underworld, especially in Greek religion. The Greek word khthon is one of several for "earth"; it typically refers to that which is under the earth, rather than the living surface of the land (as Gaia or Ge does), or the land as territory (as khora (χώρα) does

Antinomy

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 Antinomy

an·tin·o·myanˈtinəmē/nounplural noun: antinomies

  1. a contradiction between two beliefs or conclusions that are in themselves reasonable; a paradox.

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caesuras

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cae·su·rasēˈzyo͝orə,siˈZHo͞orə/nounplural noun: caesuras

  1. (in Greek and Latin verse) a break between words within a metrical foot.
    • (in modern verse) a pause near the middle of a line.
    • any interruption or break."an unaccountable caesura: no deaths were reported in the newspapers"

Mutual Materials Hardscaping

Variety of hardscaping materials available at Mutual  Materials 

Native Americans force settlers to leave Whidbey Island in August 1848. - HistoryLink.org

Excerpt Via History Link:

Whidbey Island

During the spring 1848, Thomas W. Glasgow, after exploring Puget Sound in a canoe, chose a farm site on Whidbey Island, erected a cabin, and planted potatoes, peas, and wheat. Glasgow took an Indian wife, whom he called Julia Pat-Ke-Nim, for companionship and to insure his safety from nearby Indians. After getting established, Glasgow traveled to Tumwater to convince others to join him on fertile Whidbey Island. Antonio B. Rabbeson and A. D. Carnefix agreed to settle on the island. They made the journey by canoe, the only mode of travel around Puget Sound except for an occasional Hudson's Bay Company ship.

On the journey, the three men took turns cooking and carrying out other camp duties. On the day it was Carnefix’s turn, an Indian stopped at the camp. The man assumed that Carnefix was a slave, since he was performing duties that an Indian slave would perform, and made an offer to Glasgow and Rabbeson to purchase him. The misunderstanding was quickly cleared up, but apparently Glasgow and Rabbeson ribbed Carnefix about it and he took offense, quit the group, and returned to Tumwater. The remaining two men continued on and reached Glasgow's cabin on the west side of Whidbey Island near Penn's Cove in July 1848. Penn's Cove is about 48 miles north of Seattle.

The Hunt

In August, Indians representing every Puget Sound tribe, including the Chehalis, Nisqually, Duwamish, Snoqualmie, and Snohomish, arrived and set up camp at Penn’s Cove on the east side of Whidbey Island near where Glasgow and Rabbeson where located. Within a three-mile radius of the two men’s cabin, there were, in Rabbeson's words, “about eight thousand of these wild men.” Although Rabbeson probably exaggerated, the sight of the immense throng of Indians must have been an impressive one.

History Link

More information on Chief Patkanim