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The most important thing is stop look around, take in your surroundings, what's right in front of you maybe priceless. Unmediated reality is where it's at.

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Native Americans force settlers to leave Whidbey Island in August 1848. - HistoryLink.org

Excerpt Via History Link:

Whidbey Island

During the spring 1848, Thomas W. Glasgow, after exploring Puget Sound in a canoe, chose a farm site on Whidbey Island, erected a cabin, and planted potatoes, peas, and wheat. Glasgow took an Indian wife, whom he called Julia Pat-Ke-Nim, for companionship and to insure his safety from nearby Indians. After getting established, Glasgow traveled to Tumwater to convince others to join him on fertile Whidbey Island. Antonio B. Rabbeson and A. D. Carnefix agreed to settle on the island. They made the journey by canoe, the only mode of travel around Puget Sound except for an occasional Hudson's Bay Company ship.

On the journey, the three men took turns cooking and carrying out other camp duties. On the day it was Carnefix’s turn, an Indian stopped at the camp. The man assumed that Carnefix was a slave, since he was performing duties that an Indian slave would perform, and made an offer to Glasgow and Rabbeson to purchase him. The misunderstanding was quickly cleared up, but apparently Glasgow and Rabbeson ribbed Carnefix about it and he took offense, quit the group, and returned to Tumwater. The remaining two men continued on and reached Glasgow's cabin on the west side of Whidbey Island near Penn's Cove in July 1848. Penn's Cove is about 48 miles north of Seattle.

The Hunt

In August, Indians representing every Puget Sound tribe, including the Chehalis, Nisqually, Duwamish, Snoqualmie, and Snohomish, arrived and set up camp at Penn’s Cove on the east side of Whidbey Island near where Glasgow and Rabbeson where located. Within a three-mile radius of the two men’s cabin, there were, in Rabbeson's words, “about eight thousand of these wild men.” Although Rabbeson probably exaggerated, the sight of the immense throng of Indians must have been an impressive one.

History Link

More information on Chief Patkanim

Bricolage of History

1 min read

In The Savage Mind (1962), the French anthropologist Claude Levi-Strauss used the word bricolage to describe the characteristic patterns of mythological thought. Bricolage is the skill of using whatever is at hand and recombining them to create something new. [link]

After the earthquake of 1755 rubble from the destroyed building was used as infill, the engineers and architech's developed a technique they named Pamblaino after the ‘Marquês de Pombal’ [link]

Liberalism Unmasked

1 min read

Taken from   the review   The Sound of Cracking by Pankaj Mishra

Homo economicus, who seeks to replace all other human values and interests with cost-benefit calculations, rampages across the globe: in personal relations as well as the workplace, higher education and political institutions. Pulverising the welfarist state, and even a sense of community, and contemptuous of history and tradition, he sentences hundreds of millions to economic and psychological insecurity and isolation in an opaque and hostile world. This scorched-earth universalism incites, as Santayana warned, ‘a lava-wave of primitive blindness and violence’. Many putative Augie Marches, whether in India, Russia, Japan or Israel, seem keen to surrender their onerous individuality to demagogues and to be used by them. Elsewhere, those excluded from a degraded world of man, or condemned to join its burgeoning precariat, are prone to embrace the god of destruction rather than of inner peace. The thin sound of cracking is heard from many more parts of the world as exhausted authority surrenders to nihilism.

Squaxin Island Tribe Museum Library and Research Center http://squaxinislandmuseum.org/contact-us/
Research Link : <a href="https://www.google.com/maps/place/Squaxin+Island+Tribe+Museum+Library+and+Research+Center/@47.1183305,-123.0877594,13z/data=!4m2!3m1!1s0x0000000000000000:0xb6ef174416ecb79b"> Map</a>

North Wind Weir http://www.historylink.org/index.cfm?DisplayPage=output.cfm&file_id=2590

Research Link - The North Wind Weir can be seen where the Green River Trail crosses the Duwamish River at the end of 27th Avenue South.

Small Public Outdoor Spaces

2 min read

At the intersection  of Pike, Madision and 15th is a small park  with a concrete ping pong table. Busy traffic moves by and passengers rarely notice the park. This is  McGilvra Place Park.

McGilvra

According to the City of Seattle "McGilvra Place was created in 1901. The small triangle of land is named after John J. McGilvra, whose homesite was on Lake Washington at the end of a road the would became E Madison Street."  The park is a private / public partnership with the Bullet Foundation and the  City of Seattle. Because it sits adjacent the Bullet Center, it should be well maintained over time. 

The trees are century old Plane&nbsp(Sycamores?). The short street on the east side of the park was removed to make the median a little larger and to make a friendlier pedestrian space.

The median strip before renovation:

Photo courtiesy of Berger Architects.

Spots like McGilvra Place help humnaize a busy neighborhood, having old trees on the site give it a gravity and history. There was one man sitting in the park the day I visited (saturday) maybe during the week there is more foot traffic.  

Oasis in the desert

1 min read

Next to the oldest highway in Los Angeles, the Arroyo Seco Parkway other wise know as the 110, is an island of calm, shade and history. The Lummis House, also known as El Alisal,   was built by Charles Lummis between 1897 and 1910. The  Arroy Seco Parkway was built in 1940, it is my favorite freeway in Los Angeles.

Today the house is a museum dedicated to Charles Lummis. The three acre property is a showcase of The drought-tolerant and native plants. The grounds are open two days a week this makes the area quite and some what secluded. Caravans, RVs and traveling folk park on adjacent Carlota Boulevard like wagon trains from a past era.