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The most important thing is stop look around, take in your surroundings, what's right in front of you maybe priceless. Unmediated reality is where it's at.

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Cook this: Slow-cooked chicken with a crisp corn crust from Ottolenghi Simple | National Post

Yotam Ottolenghi’s slow-cooked chicken with a crisp corn crust is serious comfort food. The filling is rich with peppers and dark chocolate, and the light topping gluten-free by nature.

“It’s the Mexican-North African equivalent of a shepherd’s pie in the sense that you’ve got a crust and you’ve got something bubbling underneath,” says Ottolenghi. “It’s really rich and wonderful in winter, and you can cook it in the winter because it’s absolutely fine with frozen corn as well as fresh corn.”

If you’d like to make this warming dish head, he suggests cooking the chicken up to three days in advance (or a month if freezing; defrost fully before using) but prepare the corn batter fresh and pour over the filling immediately prior to baking.

Columbia Hills State Park

A group of significant Native American pictographs and petroglyphs is open for viewing on regularly scheduled guided ranger tours. Among these features is the world-famous Tsagaglalal, (She Who Watches).

Privacy Manifesto

The Terms of Agreement and of Consent to Relinquish Privacy

The Woodland Edge Garden

"It is a well established fact that the most productive areas of a woodland are along its edges where higher light levels allow a greater diversity of plant growth."

A nice list of plants that thrive on the edge of the forest.

Chthonic

1 min read

Chthonic (UK: /ˈkθɒnɪk/US: /ˈθɒnɪk/ from Greek χθόνιος khthonios [kʰtʰónios], "in, under, or beneath the earth", from χθών khthōn "earth")  literally means "subterranean", but the word in English describes deities or spirits of the underworld, especially in Greek religion. The Greek word khthon is one of several for "earth"; it typically refers to that which is under the earth, rather than the living surface of the land (as Gaia or Ge does), or the land as territory (as khora (χώρα) does

Native Americans force settlers to leave Whidbey Island in August 1848. - HistoryLink.org

Excerpt Via History Link:

Whidbey Island

During the spring 1848, Thomas W. Glasgow, after exploring Puget Sound in a canoe, chose a farm site on Whidbey Island, erected a cabin, and planted potatoes, peas, and wheat. Glasgow took an Indian wife, whom he called Julia Pat-Ke-Nim, for companionship and to insure his safety from nearby Indians. After getting established, Glasgow traveled to Tumwater to convince others to join him on fertile Whidbey Island. Antonio B. Rabbeson and A. D. Carnefix agreed to settle on the island. They made the journey by canoe, the only mode of travel around Puget Sound except for an occasional Hudson's Bay Company ship.

On the journey, the three men took turns cooking and carrying out other camp duties. On the day it was Carnefix’s turn, an Indian stopped at the camp. The man assumed that Carnefix was a slave, since he was performing duties that an Indian slave would perform, and made an offer to Glasgow and Rabbeson to purchase him. The misunderstanding was quickly cleared up, but apparently Glasgow and Rabbeson ribbed Carnefix about it and he took offense, quit the group, and returned to Tumwater. The remaining two men continued on and reached Glasgow's cabin on the west side of Whidbey Island near Penn's Cove in July 1848. Penn's Cove is about 48 miles north of Seattle.

The Hunt

In August, Indians representing every Puget Sound tribe, including the Chehalis, Nisqually, Duwamish, Snoqualmie, and Snohomish, arrived and set up camp at Penn’s Cove on the east side of Whidbey Island near where Glasgow and Rabbeson where located. Within a three-mile radius of the two men’s cabin, there were, in Rabbeson's words, “about eight thousand of these wild men.” Although Rabbeson probably exaggerated, the sight of the immense throng of Indians must have been an impressive one.

History Link

More information on Chief Patkanim

Pratītyasamutpāda - Wikipedia

Pratītyasamutpāda (Sanskritप्रतीत्यसमुत्पादPaliपटिच्चसमुप्पाद paṭiccasamuppāda), commonly translated as dependent origination, or dependent arising, states that all dharmas ("things") arise in dependence upon other dharmas: "if this exists, that exists; if this ceases to exist, that also ceases to exist." The principle is applied in the twelve links of dependent origination doctrine in Buddhism, which describes the chain of causes which result in rebirth and dukkha. By breaking the chain, liberation from this endless cycles of rebirth and dukkha can be attained.[1] Everything except nirvana (nibbana) are the consequence of Pratītyasamutpāda, asserts Buddhism. This principle complements its teachings of anicca and anatta.[2]

“club effect” & gentrification

2 min read

taken from : Tidy Words & the End of the World: LeRoi Jones Reads a New Yorker Poem

In the creative city model, culture is used to increase value, be it symbolically through images or materialized. In this context, Zukin (1990) refers to “real cultural capital,” meaning spatially linked cultural capital, which becomes a reason for real investments (p. 38). As Bernt & Holm (2005) state, the cultural capital (of artists) becomes objectified and transfers onto certain places; this, in turn, makes access to it easier, as it can be consumed by anyone who enters this space. Ley (2003) examines gentrification processes and how the high level of cultural capital of artists increases the symbolic value of an area and leads to “followers” (other professionals with high levels of cultural, but also economic, capital) coming into a neighbourhood. He uses Bourdieu‟s notions of cultural and economic capital and finds that both of these concepts help to explain gentrification. [ . . . ]

Bourdieu (1999) also describes the “club effect” as a process that excludes according to economic, cultural, and also social capital. Select spaces acquire social and symbolic capital based upon “people and things which are different from the vast majority and have in common … the fact that they exclude everyone who does not present all the desired attributes …” (p. 129). This “club effect” shows that consequences like segregation and symbolic violence can result from a policy that “favors the construction of homogeneous groups on a spatial basis” (p. 129) This can be connected to the creative city concept, in which arts and culture function as enablers for a creative urban milieu, in turn enhancing the city economically and often resulting in gentrification. Artists or “creatives” play an important role here and can be seen as pioneers of gentrification, as they give their cultural capital to a certain district or space. As Bernt & Holm (2005) describe, gentrified spaces become more and more general, losing the specific characteristics that enabled their cultural distinctiveness.

link to Creative Cities and (Un)Sustainability: From Creative Class to Sustainable Creative Cities  by Sacha Kagan Julia Hahn

 

 

Invisible Interzone

Julia Melcher describes the world of these expat American writers in her essay “Invisible Interzone,” in the most recent issue of Critical Muslim.

Tangier: a city of many legends, myths and dreams. A gate between different worlds: real and unreal, seen and unseen, magic and sometimes even tragic. In the middle of the twentieth century, the International Zone of Tangier, located at the Strait of Gibraltar, not only guarded the passage to Europe and the Mediterranean Sea but also embodied a sanctuary for outcasts, for people living on the margins, for adventurers and fugitives from Western societies. Artists, criminals, lost souls and sensation seekers found a home in a city they never really belonged to. 

Frances Stonor Saunders · Where on Earth are you? · LRB 3 March 2016

 We construct borders, literally and figuratively, to fortify our sense of who we are; and we cross them in search of who we might become. They are philosophies of space, credibility contests, latitudes of neurosis, signatures to the social contract, soothing containments, scars.

An in depth look at borders, visas, identity migrants and the industry that enforces it all.

Frances Stonor Saunders’s article was delivered at the  LRB Winter Lecture series at the British Museum.

Berlin Community Radio

Berlin Community Radio

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10119 Berlin

 

Excelent Music and Culture Available World Wide.

Tokeland Hotel

Spending time with friends is the best therapy in our over clocked, over worked world, full of personal stress and global catastrophe. Here four of the six of us who traveled to the edge of the world, hang out for a brief respite on a porch.